Discovering innovations that matter since 2002

Regular Springwise readers may remember Make Me A Holiday, the intention-based site where travel agents can bid to serve travelers. Now Soverinn is setting out to create something similar, using boutique hotels which will create unique packages for travelers tailored to their needs. The site is currently in closed beta, but when it launches tourists will be encouraged to enter the details of their planned break, including dates, location and type of visit. The information will then be sent to nearby hotels on the site’s database. Those hotels can then choose to reply to travelers with offers and packages completely tailored to their needs, creating unique experiences designed to fit the traveler’s specification and reason for traveling. Soverinn’s idea is that travelers can avoid relying on review sites and get in direct contact with accommodation providers. According to the company, an element of competition between hotels is also fostered as they attempt to win the custom of the site’s users with promises of unique experiences. Soverinn will be focused on boutique hotels located in the US when it goes live. A concept to try out in your part of the world? Spotted by: Katharina Kieck Among the many opportunities presented by online retail, we’ve seen a wave of innovations aiming to hand more control of the process over to customers themselves. Body Shop Bids recently demonstrated the concept with its platform enabling car owners to solicit bids for repairs before choosing where to take their vehicle. In China, deal site Handsup.cn now aims to hand power over to the consumer by asking them to recommend products and services they want to buy, as well as the price tag. Online retailers and daily deal sites usually have a limited number of items on sale, curated by the merchant, but the concept behind Handsup.cn is to invite users to submit and vote on the products they would like to see on its virtual shelves. Hoping to create an “infinite” range of available products and services, the site also allows consumers to suggest how much they would like to pay. A greater number of voters for a particular product increases the likelihood of the price being lower. Launched in December last year, Handsup.cn perhaps goes further than we’ve seen before by handing over stock decisions and pricing guidance to its customers. This is a model to look out for, and try out, around the world! Spotted by: Smith Alan We’ve seen digital cameras become smaller, lighter and cheaper, while increasingly enabling amateur photographers to take seemingly professional photos. However, the range of different settings and configurations available can be overwhelming for many. Now, enabling consumers to edit the look of their photos after they have been taken, the Lytro Light Field Camera offers a simpler alternative. According to the company, light field sensors – which capture all of the light traveling in all directions in every point of space in front of the camera – have been in development for around 15 years, but can now be used in a consumer product. The Lytro camera is a cuboid-shaped device measuring 1.61 x 1.61 x 4.41 inches, meaning that despite its unusual form, it can be held in the palm. Inside, the sensor can detect the color, intensity and direction of light particles when the shutter is opened. Physical components found in traditional cameras are replaced with hardware which can analyse the data and present it in multiple forms. Because the camera has captured light from the entire scene in front of it, users can choose which objects they want to appear in focus after they have taken their photos by using the dedicated computer software. A digital display on the rear of the camera, meanwhile, lets users see a preview of their photos as they take them. A demo is available enabling users to test the technology on the Lytro website. The Lytro camera comes in a range of 3 colors – red, blue and gray – and 2 hard-drive sizes – 8GB and 16GB. The company is currently retailing the product from USD 399. While we have seen plenty of reiterations of the digital camera from large brands, it’s refreshing to see a small brand take them on with a dose of real innovation. One for inspiration! Spotted by: Juni Ching Husband and wife Joris Bryon and Hannelore Dewaele are the founders of Timbooktwo, a promotional video company that produces one video for a charity for every one they create for a business. Previously, Joris worked in advertising, as an account director at GGVD, McCann people, and Wanabe, while Hannelore has experience in the social sector and working within tourism. When not travelling for Timbooktwo projects, both are now based in Ghent, Belgium.
For every video made for a tourism company, Joris and Hannah donate their own time and money to produce one for a charity. In the same way online video can help increase sales, they hope footage of their chosen charity projects will encourage charitable donations.
Thanks Joris and Hannelore!
You can read more about Timbooktwo in our article here, or visit the Timbooktwo website here.
12. Any final words for aspiring entrepreneurs?
You don’t have to live your life the way other people expect you to.
Thanks Joris and Hannelore!
You can read more about Timbooktwo in our article here, or visit the Timbooktwo website here.
11. Tell Springwise a secret…
This maybe is not a secret as such, but rather a secret insight we learned from Chris Guillebeau (The Art of NonConformity), and it really opened our eyes: “Unlike what most people think, doing what you really want and radically helping others is not a contradiction. These two perspectives have traditionally been viewed as opposites. You can do something good for yourself, or you can do something good for other people. You can start your own business, or you can change the world. Why can’t you do something great for others while you are pursuing your own goals? And alternatively, why do you have to sacrifice your own goals while you are out changing the world for good?” You don’t. You can do both.
12. Any final words for aspiring entrepreneurs?
You don’t have to live your life the way other people expect you to.
Thanks Joris and Hannelore!
You can read more about Timbooktwo in our article here, or visit the Timbooktwo website here.
10. If you weren’t working on Timbooktwo, what would you be doing?
Working hard for someone else while making plans to start our own business.
11. Tell Springwise a secret…
This maybe is not a secret as such, but rather a secret insight we learned from Chris Guillebeau (The Art of NonConformity), and it really opened our eyes: “Unlike what most people think, doing what you really want and radically helping others is not a contradiction. These two perspectives have traditionally been viewed as opposites. You can do something good for yourself, or you can do something good for other people. You can start your own business, or you can change the world. Why can’t you do something great for others while you are pursuing your own goals? And alternatively, why do you have to sacrifice your own goals while you are out changing the world for good?” You don’t. You can do both.
12. Any final words for aspiring entrepreneurs?
You don’t have to live your life the way other people expect you to.
Thanks Joris and Hannelore!
You can read more about Timbooktwo in our article here, or visit the Timbooktwo website here.
9. Where do you see your business in five years, and how will you get there?
We don’t believe in five year plans. The world changes too rapidly to be thinking in five year terms. Businesses have to be flexible enough to make small and big tweaks on the go, and to see and seize short and long term opportunities that cross their path.
10. If you weren’t working on Timbooktwo, what would you be doing?
Working hard for someone else while making plans to start our own business.
11. Tell Springwise a secret…
This maybe is not a secret as such, but rather a secret insight we learned from Chris Guillebeau (The Art of NonConformity), and it really opened our eyes: “Unlike what most people think, doing what you really want and radically helping others is not a contradiction. These two perspectives have traditionally been viewed as opposites. You can do something good for yourself, or you can do something good for other people. You can start your own business, or you can change the world. Why can’t you do something great for others while you are pursuing your own goals? And alternatively, why do you have to sacrifice your own goals while you are out changing the world for good?” You don’t. You can do both.
12. Any final words for aspiring entrepreneurs?
You don’t have to live your life the way other people expect you to.
Thanks Joris and Hannelore!
You can read more about Timbooktwo in our article here, or visit the Timbooktwo website here.
8. If you were to start again, what would you do differently?
It’s still too early to tell, we only launched a few months ago.
9. Where do you see your business in five years, and how will you get there?
We don’t believe in five year plans. The world changes too rapidly to be thinking in five year terms. Businesses have to be flexible enough to make small and big tweaks on the go, and to see and seize short and long term opportunities that cross their path.
10. If you weren’t working on Timbooktwo, what would you be doing?
Working hard for someone else while making plans to start our own business.
11. Tell Springwise a secret…
This maybe is not a secret as such, but rather a secret insight we learned from Chris Guillebeau (The Art of NonConformity), and it really opened our eyes: “Unlike what most people think, doing what you really want and radically helping others is not a contradiction. These two perspectives have traditionally been viewed as opposites. You can do something good for yourself, or you can do something good for other people. You can start your own business, or you can change the world. Why can’t you do something great for others while you are pursuing your own goals? And alternatively, why do you have to sacrifice your own goals while you are out changing the world for good?” You don’t. You can do both.
12. Any final words for aspiring entrepreneurs?
You don’t have to live your life the way other people expect you to.
Thanks Joris and Hannelore!
You can read more about Timbooktwo in our article here, or visit the Timbooktwo website here.
7. What motivates you to keep going?
The belief in what we’re doing.
8. If you were to start again, what would you do differently?
It’s still too early to tell, we only launched a few months ago.
9. Where do you see your business in five years, and how will you get there?
We don’t believe in five year plans. The world changes too rapidly to be thinking in five year terms. Businesses have to be flexible enough to make small and big tweaks on the go, and to see and seize short and long term opportunities that cross their path.
10. If you weren’t working on Timbooktwo, what would you be doing?
Working hard for someone else while making plans to start our own business.
11. Tell Springwise a secret…
This maybe is not a secret as such, but rather a secret insight we learned from Chris Guillebeau (The Art of NonConformity), and it really opened our eyes: “Unlike what most people think, doing what you really want and radically helping others is not a contradiction. These two perspectives have traditionally been viewed as opposites. You can do something good for yourself, or you can do something good for other people. You can start your own business, or you can change the world. Why can’t you do something great for others while you are pursuing your own goals? And alternatively, why do you have to sacrifice your own goals while you are out changing the world for good?” You don’t. You can do both.
12. Any final words for aspiring entrepreneurs?
You don’t have to live your life the way other people expect you to.
Thanks Joris and Hannelore!
You can read more about Timbooktwo in our article here, or visit the Timbooktwo website here.
6. What drove you crazy when building your business?
It’s kind of frustrating to see how many companies still don’t see the importance of online video. According to the British Interactive Media Association, in 2013 90 percent of web traffic will be online video. That’s next year… But still a lot of companies consider online video as a nice-to-have instead of a must-have. So before we can even begin to try to sell our services, we first have to sell the idea of online video.
7. What motivates you to keep going?
The belief in what we’re doing.
8. If you were to start again, what would you do differently?
It’s still too early to tell, we only launched a few months ago.
9. Where do you see your business in five years, and how will you get there?
We don’t believe in five year plans. The world changes too rapidly to be thinking in five year terms. Businesses have to be flexible enough to make small and big tweaks on the go, and to see and seize short and long term opportunities that cross their path.
10. If you weren’t working on Timbooktwo, what would you be doing?
Working hard for someone else while making plans to start our own business.
11. Tell Springwise a secret…
This maybe is not a secret as such, but rather a secret insight we learned from Chris Guillebeau (The Art of NonConformity), and it really opened our eyes: “Unlike what most people think, doing what you really want and radically helping others is not a contradiction. These two perspectives have traditionally been viewed as opposites. You can do something good for yourself, or you can do something good for other people. You can start your own business, or you can change the world. Why can’t you do something great for others while you are pursuing your own goals? And alternatively, why do you have to sacrifice your own goals while you are out changing the world for good?” You don’t. You can do both.
12. Any final words for aspiring entrepreneurs?
You don’t have to live your life the way other people expect you to.
Thanks Joris and Hannelore!
You can read more about Timbooktwo in our article here, or visit the Timbooktwo website here.
5. What’s the secret ingredient to success as an entrepreneur?
Don’t start something only because you think you can make money with it. Start something you actually believe in. That will give you the strength to keep going when things get tough.
6. What drove you crazy when building your business?
It’s kind of frustrating to see how many companies still don’t see the importance of online video. According to the British Interactive Media Association, in 2013 90 percent of web traffic will be online video. That’s next year… But still a lot of companies consider online video as a nice-to-have instead of a must-have. So before we can even begin to try to sell our services, we first have to sell the idea of online video.
7. What motivates you to keep going?
The belief in what we’re doing.
8. If you were to start again, what would you do differently?
It’s still too early to tell, we only launched a few months ago.
9. Where do you see your business in five years, and how will you get there?
We don’t believe in five year plans. The world changes too rapidly to be thinking in five year terms. Businesses have to be flexible enough to make small and big tweaks on the go, and to see and seize short and long term opportunities that cross their path.
10. If you weren’t working on Timbooktwo, what would you be doing?
Working hard for someone else while making plans to start our own business.
11. Tell Springwise a secret…
This maybe is not a secret as such, but rather a secret insight we learned from Chris Guillebeau (The Art of NonConformity), and it really opened our eyes: “Unlike what most people think, doing what you really want and radically helping others is not a contradiction. These two perspectives have traditionally been viewed as opposites. You can do something good for yourself, or you can do something good for other people. You can start your own business, or you can change the world. Why can’t you do something great for others while you are pursuing your own goals? And alternatively, why do you have to sacrifice your own goals while you are out changing the world for good?” You don’t. You can do both.
12. Any final words for aspiring entrepreneurs?
You don’t have to live your life the way other people expect you to.
Thanks Joris and Hannelore!
You can read more about Timbooktwo in our article here, or visit the Timbooktwo website here.
4. How do you unwind or relax when you’re not working on Timbooktwo?
We recently moved to beautiful Ghent, and whenever we’re not traveling we really like to explore all the many little restaurants and cozy coffee houses in this vibrant city. When we’re in Belgium we also try to catch up with friends and family.
5. What’s the secret ingredient to success as an entrepreneur?
Don’t start something only because you think you can make money with it. Start something you actually believe in. That will give you the strength to keep going when things get tough.
6. What drove you crazy when building your business?
It’s kind of frustrating to see how many companies still don’t see the importance of online video. According to the British Interactive Media Association, in 2013 90 percent of web traffic will be online video. That’s next year… But still a lot of companies consider online video as a nice-to-have instead of a must-have. So before we can even begin to try to sell our services, we first have to sell the idea of online video.
7. What motivates you to keep going?
The belief in what we’re doing.
8. If you were to start again, what would you do differently?
It’s still too early to tell, we only launched a few months ago.
9. Where do you see your business in five years, and how will you get there?
We don’t believe in five year plans. The world changes too rapidly to be thinking in five year terms. Businesses have to be flexible enough to make small and big tweaks on the go, and to see and seize short and long term opportunities that cross their path.
10. If you weren’t working on Timbooktwo, what would you be doing?
Working hard for someone else while making plans to start our own business.
11. Tell Springwise a secret…
This maybe is not a secret as such, but rather a secret insight we learned from Chris Guillebeau (The Art of NonConformity), and it really opened our eyes: “Unlike what most people think, doing what you really want and radically helping others is not a contradiction. These two perspectives have traditionally been viewed as opposites. You can do something good for yourself, or you can do something good for other people. You can start your own business, or you can change the world. Why can’t you do something great for others while you are pursuing your own goals? And alternatively, why do you have to sacrifice your own goals while you are out changing the world for good?” You don’t. You can do both.
12. Any final words for aspiring entrepreneurs?
You don’t have to live your life the way other people expect you to.
Thanks Joris and Hannelore!
You can read more about Timbooktwo in our article here, or visit the Timbooktwo website here.
3. Can you describe a typical working day?
There’s not really a typical working day. When we’re not shooting, we’re preparing other projects, doing some administration or other office stuff. When we are on a shoot, the project determines our working day. And that could be anything from filming a marketplace at sunrise to filming crocodiles at night in a canoe on a river.
4. How do you unwind or relax when you’re not working on Timbooktwo?
We recently moved to beautiful Ghent, and whenever we’re not traveling we really like to explore all the many little restaurants and cozy coffee houses in this vibrant city. When we’re in Belgium we also try to catch up with friends and family.
5. What’s the secret ingredient to success as an entrepreneur?
Don’t start something only because you think you can make money with it. Start something you actually believe in. That will give you the strength to keep going when things get tough.
6. What drove you crazy when building your business?
It’s kind of frustrating to see how many companies still don’t see the importance of online video. According to the British Interactive Media Association, in 2013 90 percent of web traffic will be online video. That’s next year… But still a lot of companies consider online video as a nice-to-have instead of a must-have. So before we can even begin to try to sell our services, we first have to sell the idea of online video.
7. What motivates you to keep going?
The belief in what we’re doing.
8. If you were to start again, what would you do differently?
It’s still too early to tell, we only launched a few months ago.
9. Where do you see your business in five years, and how will you get there?
We don’t believe in five year plans. The world changes too rapidly to be thinking in five year terms. Businesses have to be flexible enough to make small and big tweaks on the go, and to see and seize short and long term opportunities that cross their path.
10. If you weren’t working on Timbooktwo, what would you be doing?
Working hard for someone else while making plans to start our own business.
11. Tell Springwise a secret…
This maybe is not a secret as such, but rather a secret insight we learned from Chris Guillebeau (The Art of NonConformity), and it really opened our eyes: “Unlike what most people think, doing what you really want and radically helping others is not a contradiction. These two perspectives have traditionally been viewed as opposites. You can do something good for yourself, or you can do something good for other people. You can start your own business, or you can change the world. Why can’t you do something great for others while you are pursuing your own goals? And alternatively, why do you have to sacrifice your own goals while you are out changing the world for good?” You don’t. You can do both.
12. Any final words for aspiring entrepreneurs?
You don’t have to live your life the way other people expect you to.
Thanks Joris and Hannelore!
You can read more about Timbooktwo in our article here, or visit the Timbooktwo website here.
2. Does the Buy One Give One Model really attract business, or is it simply a perk?
The Buy One Give One Model is pretty new in B2B. We’ve done a lot of research and as far as we know we’re actually the first B2B company in the world with this model. This means that we really have to explain it to businesses. Once they understand it, they like it and they see it as a nice bonus: it doesn’t cost them anything to do good. Their support is mentioned at the end of their video and the charity video, which for them is great from a CSR point of view.
3. Can you describe a typical working day?
There’s not really a typical working day. When we’re not shooting, we’re preparing other projects, doing some administration or other office stuff. When we are on a shoot, the project determines our working day. And that could be anything from filming a marketplace at sunrise to filming crocodiles at night in a canoe on a river.
4. How do you unwind or relax when you’re not working on Timbooktwo?
We recently moved to beautiful Ghent, and whenever we’re not traveling we really like to explore all the many little restaurants and cozy coffee houses in this vibrant city. When we’re in Belgium we also try to catch up with friends and family.
5. What’s the secret ingredient to success as an entrepreneur?
Don’t start something only because you think you can make money with it. Start something you actually believe in. That will give you the strength to keep going when things get tough.
6. What drove you crazy when building your business?
It’s kind of frustrating to see how many companies still don’t see the importance of online video. According to the British Interactive Media Association, in 2013 90 percent of web traffic will be online video. That’s next year… But still a lot of companies consider online video as a nice-to-have instead of a must-have. So before we can even begin to try to sell our services, we first have to sell the idea of online video.
7. What motivates you to keep going?
The belief in what we’re doing.
8. If you were to start again, what would you do differently?
It’s still too early to tell, we only launched a few months ago.
9. Where do you see your business in five years, and how will you get there?
We don’t believe in five year plans. The world changes too rapidly to be thinking in five year terms. Businesses have to be flexible enough to make small and big tweaks on the go, and to see and seize short and long term opportunities that cross their path.
10. If you weren’t working on Timbooktwo, what would you be doing?
Working hard for someone else while making plans to start our own business.
11. Tell Springwise a secret…
This maybe is not a secret as such, but rather a secret insight we learned from Chris Guillebeau (The Art of NonConformity), and it really opened our eyes: “Unlike what most people think, doing what you really want and radically helping others is not a contradiction. These two perspectives have traditionally been viewed as opposites. You can do something good for yourself, or you can do something good for other people. You can start your own business, or you can change the world. Why can’t you do something great for others while you are pursuing your own goals? And alternatively, why do you have to sacrifice your own goals while you are out changing the world for good?” You don’t. You can do both.
12. Any final words for aspiring entrepreneurs?
You don’t have to live your life the way other people expect you to.
Thanks Joris and Hannelore!
You can read more about Timbooktwo in our article here, or visit the Timbooktwo website here.
1. Where did the idea for Timbooktwo come from?
We really believe in the power and importance of online video: The ROI potential of online video is enormous. We are passionate about traveling, so we decided to focus on travel and event videos. But having traveled a lot, we have also seen a lot of misery in the world and we realized we are fortunate enough to be born in the right part of the world. So we decided we wanted to give something back. That’s why we opted for a buy one give one business model. Because we believe video is not only a powerful tool for business but also for charities: it can help them show what’s being done with donations and hence raise more funds.
2. Does the Buy One Give One Model really attract business, or is it simply a perk?
The Buy One Give One Model is pretty new in B2B. We’ve done a lot of research and as far as we know we’re actually the first B2B company in the world with this model. This means that we really have to explain it to businesses. Once they understand it, they like it and they see it as a nice bonus: it doesn’t cost them anything to do good. Their support is mentioned at the end of their video and the charity video, which for them is great from a CSR point of view.
3. Can you describe a typical working day?
There’s not really a typical working day. When we’re not shooting, we’re preparing other projects, doing some administration or other office stuff. When we are on a shoot, the project determines our working day. And that could be anything from filming a marketplace at sunrise to filming crocodiles at night in a canoe on a river.
4. How do you unwind or relax when you’re not working on Timbooktwo?
We recently moved to beautiful Ghent, and whenever we’re not traveling we really like to explore all the many little restaurants and cozy coffee houses in this vibrant city. When we’re in Belgium we also try to catch up with friends and family.
5. What’s the secret ingredient to success as an entrepreneur?
Don’t start something only because you think you can make money with it. Start something you actually believe in. That will give you the strength to keep going when things get tough.
6. What drove you crazy when building your business?
It’s kind of frustrating to see how many companies still don’t see the importance of online video. According to the British Interactive Media Association, in 2013 90 percent of web traffic will be online video. That’s next year… But still a lot of companies consider online video as a nice-to-have instead of a must-have. So before we can even begin to try to sell our services, we first have to sell the idea of online video.
7. What motivates you to keep going?
The belief in what we’re doing.
8. If you were to start again, what would you do differently?
It’s still too early to tell, we only launched a few months ago.
9. Where do you see your business in five years, and how will you get there?
We don’t believe in five year plans. The world changes too rapidly to be thinking in five year terms. Businesses have to be flexible enough to make small and big tweaks on the go, and to see and seize short and long term opportunities that cross their path.
10. If you weren’t working on Timbooktwo, what would you be doing?
Working hard for someone else while making plans to start our own business.
11. Tell Springwise a secret…
This maybe is not a secret as such, but rather a secret insight we learned from Chris Guillebeau (The Art of NonConformity), and it really opened our eyes: “Unlike what most people think, doing what you really want and radically helping others is not a contradiction. These two perspectives have traditionally been viewed as opposites. You can do something good for yourself, or you can do something good for other people. You can start your own business, or you can change the world. Why can’t you do something great for others while you are pursuing your own goals? And alternatively, why do you have to sacrifice your own goals while you are out changing the world for good?” You don’t. You can do both.
12. Any final words for aspiring entrepreneurs?
You don’t have to live your life the way other people expect you to.
Thanks Joris and Hannelore!
You can read more about Timbooktwo in our article here, or visit the Timbooktwo website here. Regular Springwise readers will remember Stayhound, which matches vacationing dog owners with local pet sitters, and the Hundehiet dog ‘lockers’ for Norwegian shoppers. Now DOGTV has launched a 24/7 cable television channel in San Diego which aims to keep pooches entertained with specialist programming. The company has worked with animal behavior researchers over the past few years in order to develop its content, aimed specifically at dogs. According to DOGTV, canines are happier when a television is on and the channel has been tested to ensure it captures a dog’s attention. It will be broadcasting three types of programs — calming sections to reduce animal anxiety, stimulating sections to keep dogs entertained and segments aimed at improving their behavior. The Humane Society of the United States has recognized the channel and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals has also accepted its techniques. The concept aims to offer a solution for busy pet owners needing to spend time away from their pets and also to reduce the stress placed on dogs left at home alone. With detailed research backing its execution, this could be one to replicate elsewhere. Spotted by: Jim Stewart We’ve already seen the iPad being used to assist teachers with student feedback when we covered SquareCrumbs last year, and now Chicago-based GoSoapBox is setting out to do something similar with its new platform for smartphones, tablets and laptops. GoSoapBox enables teachers to set up ‘events’ – such as multiple-choice questions, open quizzes or opinion polls – and then provides those teachers with results from each student once they have answered using the platform. Whereas tutors would traditionally pose a question and ask a pupil to answer out loud in class, the interface is designed to provide an engaging way for students to interact with the lesson material while anonymizing the answering process to dispel students’ fears of answering incorrectly. Students can also choose from a list of questions already posed by the teacher in order to rank the areas they want to go over by priority. The platform features a ‘confusion barometer’ as well, with which pupils can inform class leaders if they do not fully understand a topic. The real-time data is presented in a graphic way so that teachers can easily see how their class is faring. The video below explains the platform in greater detail:
As we’ve seen before on Springwise, web-based mobile technology is increasingly becoming an essential part of the classroom. Others involved in education, what about you? Spotted by: Florent Lesauvage Much the way the ColaLife project has worked to piggy-back on Coca-Cola’s formidable distribution networks to get medicine dispersed where it’s most needed, so the Books for Colombia effort aimed to capitalize on the pizza deliveries in Spain to get books to the Colombian needy. Taking place between January 10 and February 10 of this year, the Books for Colombia project was a joint effort between Spanish airline Iberia, social network ideas4all and pizza delivery firm Telepizza. The concept was based on the suggestion of a Telepizza employee who saw the potential of the empty-handed drivers on their way back from delivering pizzas. Aiming to put that potential to work for good, the effort invited delivery customers in Madrid to donate unwanted books for delivery to the needy in Colombia. Telepizza drivers used the empty space in their vehicles to transport the books to the local Telepizza outlet; from there, they were sent via Iberia aircraft to Colombia, where NGO BuenaNota handled distribution in 120 libraries and schools throughout the country, potentially reaching more than 98,000 children and teenagers. The lesson to be learned? Every business-driven trip, whether to or fro, is an opportunity to do something more. How could your brand add a social benefit to the journeys it’s already making? Spotted by: www.airlinetrends.com The virtual ink had barely dried on our story about feedair when we got word of another tool that delivers users’ social media streams in an alternative form. Currently focusing on Twitter, The Social Radio is an app that reads incoming tweets aloud, enabling users to listen to updates in much the same way as they would listen to a radio. Argentina-based The Social Radio made its debut late last year with an Android app, but versions for the web and for other mobile platforms are in the works, as is Facebook integration. For now, users begin by signing in via Twitter. The app then works in the background, with automatic language detection for each tweet. Users can listen to their Twitter timeline, lists, trending topics, hashtags and searches; during the breaks, they can listen to music from their playlists as well. The video below (in Spanish) demonstrates The Social Radio in action.
Full versions of The Social Radio for Android and iOS are currently free for a limited time, and its maker says a version for the web is imminent. App-minded entrepreneurs around the globe: one to get involved in? Spotted by: Smith Alan Captions have long been available for television and movies, but live theater has traditionally been trickier to understand for those with hearing loss or other impairments. That’s where Australian The Captioning Studio comes in, with a new app that delivers real-time theater captioning on smartphone and tablet devices. Launched earlier this year, The Captioning Studio’s new, patented GoTheatrical app gives users a way to receive captions for selected live theater performances, beginning with Andrew McKinnon’s production of ‘Dickens’ Women’ at Canberra’s The Playhouse in February. To use the app, theatergoers simply register to access the list of upcoming events and select the performance they’re attending. Then, during a performance, actors’ lines appear on-screen as the actors speak them. Also included in GoTheatrical’s captioning are ad libs, asides, song lyrics, musical descriptions and other sound effects. The app is currently priced at USD 1.99 on Apple’s App Store. The video below explains the premise in further detail:
There are more than 4 million consumers with hearing loss in Australia alone, The Captioning Studio says, and that’s in addition to the countless theatergoers speaking a language other than English. How could your brand make live entertainment more accessible to a larger audience? We’ve seen plenty of brewery related innovations over the years on Springwise, but recently we came across another notable example. The University of British Columbia’s alma mater society is in the process of creating what it says is the world’s first student-owned campus microbrewery. The UBC Alma Mater Society (AMS) already sells about CAD 1 million a year in alcohol and food at two Vancouver campus outlets, and now there are plans for a student-owned brewery to be built in a new student union building set to be finished in 2014, according to a report in The Province. Plans call for the new microbrewery to occupy the 1,000-square-foot basement of the new building, groundbreaking for which will take place at the end of February. The brewery is reportedly expected to add between CAD 500,000 and CAD 1 million to the new building’s CAD 103 million building budget. “We hope to pay it off relatively quickly. We go through a lot of beer,” commented the AMS president Jeremy McElroy. Is there any match more natural than college students and a microbrewery? Campuses and student organizations around the globe, there’s plenty for inspiration here.