Create the Future. Today

Situated at the intersection of food and technology, NotCo (The Not Company) used artificial intelligence to create the world’s smartest chef. Nicknamed Guiseppe, the advanced algorithm examines the molecular structures of meat and dairy products and attempts to replicate them using plant material.

The company says the secret to creating notably good-tasting vegan meats, eggs, milk and cheeses is to find plants that have similar molecular structures. The final product should have almost identical flavors and textures. When Guiseppe creates a recipe, the algorithm not only considers the relative availability of various plants, it also tries to enhance nutrition by including additional sustainable ingredients. Products available so far are NotMilk (made from nuts, rice, peas, linseed, and coconut), NotHotdogs, NotChocolate, NotMayo, with more in development.

With animal agriculture using nearly a quarter of the world’s water supply and 45 percent of available land, meat and dairy products are especially unsustainable and environmentally unfriendly. By helping people eat more healthily without compromising flavor and texture, NotCo hopes to lead a revolution in sustainable protein.

So far, much of the work in food tech has focused either on the processes of buying, selling and delivery, such as paying for coffee with a smart cup, or finding new methods of sustainable production — even if it is in the form of desktop hive farms. NotCo takes the tech directly into the kitchen, creating recipes designed to be used by the average cook.

Are there other industries that could use plant-based, molecular-level replication to increase sustainability?

Two hugely valuable commodities in the modern working world are great content and affordable working spaces. Marrying the two is Blogfabrik, a co-working space and publication in Berlin that invites freelancers to work on their personal projects there rent-free in exchange for monthly contributions to the blog.

blogfabrik-1-coworking-space-content-creative-workspace

Bloqfabrik, which translates to Blog Factory, has been operating for nearly a year. It is a spacious co-working environment, complete with a photography studio, event space, and meeting rooms. It currently houses 30 freelancers, who contribute two pieces of content each month to the company’s online magazine DailyBreadMag, which in turn promotes the working space and the events that are hosted there. Freelancers pitch content ideas to creative director Claudio Rimmele and are also required to organize one event per year and promote the magazine and its home using their social media channels.

blogfabrik-2-coworking-space-content-creative-workspace

The space will soon be offering “flex” desks too — these enable part-timers to make use of the space sporadically in exchange for one contribution to DailyBreadMag each month. What other valuable skills can be exchanged for rent in co-working spaces?

Mixing quality design with personalized home delivery, Cora’s tampons are made from 100 percent certified organic cotton, biodegradable and hypoallergenic. Subscribers choose from a variety of sizes and quantities and receive a regular delivery every three months.

Cora’s founders set up the company in response to the lack of regulation of menstrual hygiene products, on top of insufficient testing of the long-term effects of trace toxins, which can be found in most tampons currently on the market. The packaging of Cora tampons is designed specifically to replace the plastic, brightly colored boxes and wrappers used by many brands with something environmentally-friendly and stylish.

The first delivery of a subscription comes with what the company calls a Little Black Box, a Little Black Clutch and Stowaways — vegan leather cases for all the different times and places women need tampons. The tampons are packaged in soft and silent wrappers, so quiet bathroom are not intimidating for first-timers or teens at school.

cora-tampon-organic-subscription

Though we have already seen another tampon delivery service, and an organization working on making menstrual hygiene products sustainable, accessible and relevant to different cultures, Cora combines the best of both ideas and offers a discreet alternative so women can have an easy period experience.

Partnering with local social enterprises and manufacturing units, Cora matches the sales from its subscription service each month with purchases of locally made menstrual pads. The pads are distributed to girls who otherwise would be unable to afford or access such hygiene products.

Are there other overlooked areas of personal hygiene that could be given an eco makeover?

We have seen new smart sports technology designed to keep competitors safe, such as a protective collar for high impact collisions. Now, an Austria sportswear startup is using 3D printing to develop state of the art shin guards.

Father-son startup Zweikampf are the brains behind the world’s first serially 3D printed shin guard. The guard uses a 3D printed shell and weighs just 75 grams. The company say the shin guard uses a Y structure, only made possible due to the introduction of effective 3D printing, and its structure replicates the kind of armor structure that have been used by Japanese Samurai for hundreds of years.

The startup claims that the Y pattern will allow the shin guard to redistribute shock across the surface of the guard, reducing the risk of injury. The shin guard has also been launched on Kickstarter, and the company is seeking EUR 50,000 in backing for the Zweikampf project.

3D printing is revolutionizing the industry of custom fit accessories, and we have seen the tech being used to produce glasses, shoes, insoles and ankle braces. What will be next?

Even frequent flyers are unlikely to be traveling as much when they become new parents. Previously, those loyal customers would have lost their membership status and had to rebuild to silver, gold or platinum benefits. But now, Qantas’ Status Hold initiative will enable customers to take ‘parental leave’ and maintain their status over a 18 month period after having a child.

Any Qantas Frequent Flyer member who is expecting or has just had a child can participate. They must simply show that they are taking six consecutive months off paid employment to spend time with their family. Both parents are applicable, as are foster parents or those adopting. The scheme enables them to continue enjoying benefits such as lounge access, membership offers and preferred seating options, without needing to earn the required amount of points.

What other businesses could offer parental leave schemes to loyal customers?

We have seen microgrids deployed around the world to provide sustainable energy, with projects providing solar power to homes in rural Africa. Now, a microgrid in the US is using smart contracts that buy and sell energy securely using blockchain.

Transactivgrid is a sustainable energy grid based in Brooklyn, New York. The grid connects users to solar energy in the neighborhood, and makes use of a blockchain system to ensure all payments are secure. The startup says this offers a hardware and a software solution.

The grid uses nodes to count up transactions between users buying and selling energy. Blockchain, a by-product of Bitcoin transactions, allows these many transactions to be recorded and effectively verified for buyers and sellers even on a very small scale — this ensures that no energy is lost.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CRlOophUDlg

The startup say using blockchain technology to keep a full record of the transactions could make auditing the books much more efficient in community energy. As community energy projects and peer-to-peer transactions become more commonplace, such software could be key to keeping track of all the energy transfers in a sophisticated grid.

How else can sharing economy microgrids become more useable and integrated into existing energy infrastructures?

If bots are the new apps, as most tech commentators are suggesting, it won’t be long before demand skyrockets for the simple software application. But while the tasks that bots perform are often simple and repetitive, building the bots themselves requires both skill and time. Hoping to change this is Meya, a Canada-based startup that just launched a bot platform, which enables anyone to design and integrate a bot into any messaging app.

Meya was previously building general intelligent assistants and private bots for restaurants. But the company has now opened up the tool to enable businesses to create their own bots to integrate into messaging apps, with a limited amount of coding. The application is currently in Beta and works best to aid the creation of transactional bots that can process orders and bookings. It currently supports Twitter, Slack, Kik, Telegram and SMS via Twilio, but in the future it plans to have more integration options as well as further potential applications. Once a bot has been built it can easily be integrated into other messaging apps.

What other services could be offered to support the growing demand for bots?

We’ve seen a startups that assist the unpredictable schedule of freelancers, such as this platform that fronts money for invoices that have yet to clear, and now Boonle wants to help budding freelancers find jobs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7y6clL3JIcA

First, businesses list projects such as logo design or blog writing on Boonle. These listings are then selected by freelancers, who acquire them on a first-come, first-serve basis regardless of experience. But the projects are priced according to a pay-what-you-want model, and there is no guarantee of monetary reward for freelancers. By completing high quality projects, freelancers can receive ‘appreciations’, good reviews, and suggested monetary tips from businesses, of which Boonle takes 30 percent. When users receive enough appreciation they level-up, and can receive a higher average tip rate for their work. Freelancers can also work towards level 10, granting them access to Boonle’s VIP projects, which will earn them higher pay.

With their principle of first-come, first serve, Boonle helps rookie freelancers gain vital experience. Could a platform create a more stable freelance schedule, by taking small amounts of pooled income to create resources for holiday and sick pay?

10 Supply drones could help prevent unwanted pregnancies in Ghana

It wouldn’t be an innovation count down without the ever-present robotic fleets that now populate our skies. Just like 3D printing, VR and other emerging tech, drones are being experimented with in many different industries. Carried out by the United Nations Population Fund, UAVs are now supplying condoms, birth control pills, and other medical supplies to the Upper East Region of Ghana.

Read more about UNPF »

9 Posture-correcting eyewear turns off devices

Many medtech solutions we’re seeing are helping users not to do instead of do. EyeForcer is one such disabler, and will track users’ posture and shut of their devices if they don’t straighten up.

Read more about EyeForcer »

10 Supply drones could help prevent unwanted pregnancies in Ghana

It wouldn’t be an innovation count down without the ever-present robotic fleets that now populate our skies. Just like 3D printing, VR and other emerging tech, drones are being experimented with in many different industries. Carried out by the United Nations Population Fund, UAVs are now supplying condoms, birth control pills, and other medical supplies to the Upper East Region of Ghana.

Read more about UNPF »

8 Smart toothbrush and dental plan combo rewards good habits

Although smart toothbrushes are not a new idea, a dental insurance startup is making novel use of the tech. Beam’s toothbrush kit and app rewards good habits, and conscientious brushers can get a discount on treatment, or receive cash back on their insurance plan.

Read more about Beam »

9 Posture-correcting eyewear turns off devices

Many medtech solutions we’re seeing are helping users not to do instead of do. EyeForcer is one such disabler, and will track users’ posture and shut of their devices if they don’t straighten up.

Read more about EyeForcer »

10 Supply drones could help prevent unwanted pregnancies in Ghana

It wouldn’t be an innovation count down without the ever-present robotic fleets that now populate our skies. Just like 3D printing, VR and other emerging tech, drones are being experimented with in many different industries. Carried out by the United Nations Population Fund, UAVs are now supplying condoms, birth control pills, and other medical supplies to the Upper East Region of Ghana.

Read more about UNPF »

7 Makerspace can realize inventive nurses’ ideas

While the majority of discussions relating to national health care systems centre around infrastructure and funding, most of the innovations we’re seeing on Springwise are geared towards finding “bottom up” solutions. MakerNurse is a great example of this. The initiative mobilizes the creative and problem solving potential of nurses — who are often the first point of contact for patient difficulties — by providing a workspace full of materials that they can use to invent functional hospital equipment.

Read more about MakerNurse »

8 Smart toothbrush and dental plan combo rewards good habits

Although smart toothbrushes are not a new idea, a dental insurance startup is making novel use of the tech. Beam’s toothbrush kit and app rewards good habits, and conscientious brushers can get a discount on treatment, or receive cash back on their insurance plan.

Read more about Beam »

9 Posture-correcting eyewear turns off devices

Many medtech solutions we’re seeing are helping users not to do instead of do. EyeForcer is one such disabler, and will track users’ posture and shut of their devices if they don’t straighten up.

Read more about EyeForcer »

10 Supply drones could help prevent unwanted pregnancies in Ghana

It wouldn’t be an innovation count down without the ever-present robotic fleets that now populate our skies. Just like 3D printing, VR and other emerging tech, drones are being experimented with in many different industries. Carried out by the United Nations Population Fund, UAVs are now supplying condoms, birth control pills, and other medical supplies to the Upper East Region of Ghana.

Read more about UNPF »

6 Ring tests for STDs and sends results to a smartphone

There can still be a stigma attached to visiting a sexual health clinic, and this leads to infected but sexually active people spreading diseases instead of getting treated. At-home tests are being made more available, but Hoope’s wearable makes the process quick and painless. Fitting onto users’ thumbs, the device will rapidly run blood tests of the four most common and curable STDs, and send results to an app.

Read more about Hoope »

7 Makerspace can realize inventive nurses’ ideas

While the majority of discussions relating to national health care systems centre around infrastructure and funding, most of the innovations we’re seeing on Springwise are geared towards finding “bottom up” solutions. MakerNurse is a great example of this. The initiative mobilizes the creative and problem solving potential of nurses — who are often the first point of contact for patient difficulties — by providing a workspace full of materials that they can use to invent functional hospital equipment.

Read more about MakerNurse »

8 Smart toothbrush and dental plan combo rewards good habits

Although smart toothbrushes are not a new idea, a dental insurance startup is making novel use of the tech. Beam’s toothbrush kit and app rewards good habits, and conscientious brushers can get a discount on treatment, or receive cash back on their insurance plan.

Read more about Beam »

9 Posture-correcting eyewear turns off devices

Many medtech solutions we’re seeing are helping users not to do instead of do. EyeForcer is one such disabler, and will track users’ posture and shut of their devices if they don’t straighten up.

Read more about EyeForcer »

10 Supply drones could help prevent unwanted pregnancies in Ghana

It wouldn’t be an innovation count down without the ever-present robotic fleets that now populate our skies. Just like 3D printing, VR and other emerging tech, drones are being experimented with in many different industries. Carried out by the United Nations Population Fund, UAVs are now supplying condoms, birth control pills, and other medical supplies to the Upper East Region of Ghana.

Read more about UNPF »

4 App helps paralyzed stroke victims communicate emotions

Stroke patients often lose the power of speech and vision, and many are left isolated, unable to communicate with loved ones. Using a Brain Computer Interface, I.am.here is a mobile app that translates paralyzed victims’ emotions into simple statements, such as “I’m so happy” or “I feel bored.”

Read more about I.am.here »

5 Thai restaurant organizes menu by blood type

As medical tech advances, it is easier than ever for consumers to know about their own specific health needs. This opens up a whole new area of ultra-personalization, which innovative businesses can now offer their customers. At restaurant The Third Floor in Bangkok, menus are organized by blood type, so diners can choose a meal that will best complement their specific dietary needs.

Users who are interested in their own DNA can also browse the Genome Compass — an app founded by gene sequencing scientists, which will deliver news and knowledge relevant to their unique genetic makeup. OpenBiome is another business making the most of health personalization. The startup enables users to create and store samples of their own microbial community, so that in the case of infections, it can be used to repopulate their own unique gut bacteria.

Read more about The Third Floor »

6 Ring tests for STDs and sends results to a smartphone

There can still be a stigma attached to visiting a sexual health clinic, and this leads to infected but sexually active people spreading diseases instead of getting treated. At-home tests are being made more available, but Hoope’s wearable makes the process quick and painless. Fitting onto users’ thumbs, the device will rapidly run blood tests of the four most common and curable STDs, and send results to an app.

Read more about Hoope »

7 Makerspace can realize inventive nurses’ ideas

While the majority of discussions relating to national health care systems centre around infrastructure and funding, most of the innovations we’re seeing on Springwise are geared towards finding “bottom up” solutions. MakerNurse is a great example of this. The initiative mobilizes the creative and problem solving potential of nurses — who are often the first point of contact for patient difficulties — by providing a workspace full of materials that they can use to invent functional hospital equipment.

Read more about MakerNurse »

8 Smart toothbrush and dental plan combo rewards good habits

Although smart toothbrushes are not a new idea, a dental insurance startup is making novel use of the tech. Beam’s toothbrush kit and app rewards good habits, and conscientious brushers can get a discount on treatment, or receive cash back on their insurance plan.

Read more about Beam »

9 Posture-correcting eyewear turns off devices

Many medtech solutions we’re seeing are helping users not to do instead of do. EyeForcer is one such disabler, and will track users’ posture and shut of their devices if they don’t straighten up.

Read more about EyeForcer »

10 Supply drones could help prevent unwanted pregnancies in Ghana

It wouldn’t be an innovation count down without the ever-present robotic fleets that now populate our skies. Just like 3D printing, VR and other emerging tech, drones are being experimented with in many different industries. Carried out by the United Nations Population Fund, UAVs are now supplying condoms, birth control pills, and other medical supplies to the Upper East Region of Ghana.

Read more about UNPF »

3 Snowy VR world reduces pain in burn victims

Many industries are exploring new uses of virtual reality, but the most impressive feats are arguably coming from health care. Deepstream VR has created “COOL!”, a first-person shooter game that aims to distract burn victims from the pain of getting their wounds cleaned or their skin grafted, by immersing them in an icy, snowy atmosphere.

We also saw Virtual Reality Cave, a game that puts recovering addicts in high-stimulus environments, so they can learn coping mechanisms. Departing slightly from VR, the research hospital St Jude recently launched Dream Adventures, where employees visit various destinations as requested by the hospitalized children, who can virtually experience the travel via a 360 degree camera, and ask questions and make requests in real-time.

Read more about DeepStream VR »

4 App helps paralyzed stroke victims communicate emotions

Stroke patients often lose the power of speech and vision, and many are left isolated, unable to communicate with loved ones. Using a Brain Computer Interface, I.am.here is a mobile app that translates paralyzed victims’ emotions into simple statements, such as “I’m so happy” or “I feel bored.”

Read more about I.am.here »

5 Thai restaurant organizes menu by blood type

As medical tech advances, it is easier than ever for consumers to know about their own specific health needs. This opens up a whole new area of ultra-personalization, which innovative businesses can now offer their customers. At restaurant The Third Floor in Bangkok, menus are organized by blood type, so diners can choose a meal that will best complement their specific dietary needs.

Users who are interested in their own DNA can also browse the Genome Compass — an app founded by gene sequencing scientists, which will deliver news and knowledge relevant to their unique genetic makeup. OpenBiome is another business making the most of health personalization. The startup enables users to create and store samples of their own microbial community, so that in the case of infections, it can be used to repopulate their own unique gut bacteria.

Read more about The Third Floor »

6 Ring tests for STDs and sends results to a smartphone

There can still be a stigma attached to visiting a sexual health clinic, and this leads to infected but sexually active people spreading diseases instead of getting treated. At-home tests are being made more available, but Hoope’s wearable makes the process quick and painless. Fitting onto users’ thumbs, the device will rapidly run blood tests of the four most common and curable STDs, and send results to an app.

Read more about Hoope »

7 Makerspace can realize inventive nurses’ ideas

While the majority of discussions relating to national health care systems centre around infrastructure and funding, most of the innovations we’re seeing on Springwise are geared towards finding “bottom up” solutions. MakerNurse is a great example of this. The initiative mobilizes the creative and problem solving potential of nurses — who are often the first point of contact for patient difficulties — by providing a workspace full of materials that they can use to invent functional hospital equipment.

Read more about MakerNurse »

8 Smart toothbrush and dental plan combo rewards good habits

Although smart toothbrushes are not a new idea, a dental insurance startup is making novel use of the tech. Beam’s toothbrush kit and app rewards good habits, and conscientious brushers can get a discount on treatment, or receive cash back on their insurance plan.

Read more about Beam »

9 Posture-correcting eyewear turns off devices

Many medtech solutions we’re seeing are helping users not to do instead of do. EyeForcer is one such disabler, and will track users’ posture and shut of their devices if they don’t straighten up.

Read more about EyeForcer »

10 Supply drones could help prevent unwanted pregnancies in Ghana

It wouldn’t be an innovation count down without the ever-present robotic fleets that now populate our skies. Just like 3D printing, VR and other emerging tech, drones are being experimented with in many different industries. Carried out by the United Nations Population Fund, UAVs are now supplying condoms, birth control pills, and other medical supplies to the Upper East Region of Ghana.

Read more about UNPF »

2 Superhero-themed bionic hands for young amputees

As 3D printing becomes more accessible, options for prosthetics have broadened significantly for those who need them. Startup Open Bionics launched three superhero themed robotic hands that aimed to help amputated youngsters make a physical and emotional recovery from their unfortunate losses — instead of doing boring physical therapy, they can train to become superheroes.

Read more about Open Bionics »

3 Snowy VR world reduces pain in burn victims

Many industries are exploring new uses of virtual reality, but the most impressive feats are arguably coming from health care. Deepstream VR has created “COOL!”, a first-person shooter game that aims to distract burn victims from the pain of getting their wounds cleaned or their skin grafted, by immersing them in an icy, snowy atmosphere.

We also saw Virtual Reality Cave, a game that puts recovering addicts in high-stimulus environments, so they can learn coping mechanisms. Departing slightly from VR, the research hospital St Jude recently launched Dream Adventures, where employees visit various destinations as requested by the hospitalized children, who can virtually experience the travel via a 360 degree camera, and ask questions and make requests in real-time.

Read more about DeepStream VR »

4 App helps paralyzed stroke victims communicate emotions

Stroke patients often lose the power of speech and vision, and many are left isolated, unable to communicate with loved ones. Using a Brain Computer Interface, I.am.here is a mobile app that translates paralyzed victims’ emotions into simple statements, such as “I’m so happy” or “I feel bored.”

Read more about I.am.here »

5 Thai restaurant organizes menu by blood type

As medical tech advances, it is easier than ever for consumers to know about their own specific health needs. This opens up a whole new area of ultra-personalization, which innovative businesses can now offer their customers. At restaurant The Third Floor in Bangkok, menus are organized by blood type, so diners can choose a meal that will best complement their specific dietary needs.

Users who are interested in their own DNA can also browse the Genome Compass — an app founded by gene sequencing scientists, which will deliver news and knowledge relevant to their unique genetic makeup. OpenBiome is another business making the most of health personalization. The startup enables users to create and store samples of their own microbial community, so that in the case of infections, it can be used to repopulate their own unique gut bacteria.

Read more about The Third Floor »

6 Ring tests for STDs and sends results to a smartphone

There can still be a stigma attached to visiting a sexual health clinic, and this leads to infected but sexually active people spreading diseases instead of getting treated. At-home tests are being made more available, but Hoope’s wearable makes the process quick and painless. Fitting onto users’ thumbs, the device will rapidly run blood tests of the four most common and curable STDs, and send results to an app.

Read more about Hoope »

7 Makerspace can realize inventive nurses’ ideas

While the majority of discussions relating to national health care systems centre around infrastructure and funding, most of the innovations we’re seeing on Springwise are geared towards finding “bottom up” solutions. MakerNurse is a great example of this. The initiative mobilizes the creative and problem solving potential of nurses — who are often the first point of contact for patient difficulties — by providing a workspace full of materials that they can use to invent functional hospital equipment.

Read more about MakerNurse »

8 Smart toothbrush and dental plan combo rewards good habits

Although smart toothbrushes are not a new idea, a dental insurance startup is making novel use of the tech. Beam’s toothbrush kit and app rewards good habits, and conscientious brushers can get a discount on treatment, or receive cash back on their insurance plan.

Read more about Beam »

9 Posture-correcting eyewear turns off devices

Many medtech solutions we’re seeing are helping users not to do instead of do. EyeForcer is one such disabler, and will track users’ posture and shut of their devices if they don’t straighten up.

Read more about EyeForcer »

10 Supply drones could help prevent unwanted pregnancies in Ghana

It wouldn’t be an innovation count down without the ever-present robotic fleets that now populate our skies. Just like 3D printing, VR and other emerging tech, drones are being experimented with in many different industries. Carried out by the United Nations Population Fund, UAVs are now supplying condoms, birth control pills, and other medical supplies to the Upper East Region of Ghana.

Read more about UNPF »

1 Glasses transcribe text for the hearing impaired

When Google Glass debuted in 2013, the usual public scepticism that surrounds any new tech seemed be at a record high. In some ways, it was an appropriate response to the cumbersome (and dorky) device, which, for the general user, did not justify itself with its functionality. But this past year we have seen many new developments in smart glasses that have the potential to benefit those with niche needs.

For five percent of the world’s population who have hearing loss, the transcribing glasses from Frants Innovators could have a huge impact on their lives. The device, which can be clipped onto any pair of spectacles, uses Siri-esque voice recognition to translate language in real-time, displaying the text on a small screen in the corner of the user’s vision. We also saw Autism Glass, which uses artificial intelligence to decipher facial expressions and provide social cues for autistic users.

Read more about Frants Innovators »

2 Superhero-themed bionic hands for young amputees

As 3D printing becomes more accessible, options for prosthetics have broadened significantly for those who need them. Startup Open Bionics launched three superhero themed robotic hands that aimed to help amputated youngsters make a physical and emotional recovery from their unfortunate losses — instead of doing boring physical therapy, they can train to become superheroes.

Read more about Open Bionics »

3 Snowy VR world reduces pain in burn victims

Many industries are exploring new uses of virtual reality, but the most impressive feats are arguably coming from health care. Deepstream VR has created “COOL!”, a first-person shooter game that aims to distract burn victims from the pain of getting their wounds cleaned or their skin grafted, by immersing them in an icy, snowy atmosphere.

We also saw Virtual Reality Cave, a game that puts recovering addicts in high-stimulus environments, so they can learn coping mechanisms. Departing slightly from VR, the research hospital St Jude recently launched Dream Adventures, where employees visit various destinations as requested by the hospitalized children, who can virtually experience the travel via a 360 degree camera, and ask questions and make requests in real-time.

Read more about DeepStream VR »

4 App helps paralyzed stroke victims communicate emotions

Stroke patients often lose the power of speech and vision, and many are left isolated, unable to communicate with loved ones. Using a Brain Computer Interface, I.am.here is a mobile app that translates paralyzed victims’ emotions into simple statements, such as “I’m so happy” or “I feel bored.”

Read more about I.am.here »

5 Thai restaurant organizes menu by blood type

As medical tech advances, it is easier than ever for consumers to know about their own specific health needs. This opens up a whole new area of ultra-personalization, which innovative businesses can now offer their customers. At restaurant The Third Floor in Bangkok, menus are organized by blood type, so diners can choose a meal that will best complement their specific dietary needs.

Users who are interested in their own DNA can also browse the Genome Compass — an app founded by gene sequencing scientists, which will deliver news and knowledge relevant to their unique genetic makeup. OpenBiome is another business making the most of health personalization. The startup enables users to create and store samples of their own microbial community, so that in the case of infections, it can be used to repopulate their own unique gut bacteria.

Read more about The Third Floor »

6 Ring tests for STDs and sends results to a smartphone

There can still be a stigma attached to visiting a sexual health clinic, and this leads to infected but sexually active people spreading diseases instead of getting treated. At-home tests are being made more available, but Hoope’s wearable makes the process quick and painless. Fitting onto users’ thumbs, the device will rapidly run blood tests of the four most common and curable STDs, and send results to an app.

Read more about Hoope »

7 Makerspace can realize inventive nurses’ ideas

While the majority of discussions relating to national health care systems centre around infrastructure and funding, most of the innovations we’re seeing on Springwise are geared towards finding “bottom up” solutions. MakerNurse is a great example of this. The initiative mobilizes the creative and problem solving potential of nurses — who are often the first point of contact for patient difficulties — by providing a workspace full of materials that they can use to invent functional hospital equipment.

Read more about MakerNurse »

8 Smart toothbrush and dental plan combo rewards good habits

Although smart toothbrushes are not a new idea, a dental insurance startup is making novel use of the tech. Beam’s toothbrush kit and app rewards good habits, and conscientious brushers can get a discount on treatment, or receive cash back on their insurance plan.

Read more about Beam »

9 Posture-correcting eyewear turns off devices

Many medtech solutions we’re seeing are helping users not to do instead of do. EyeForcer is one such disabler, and will track users’ posture and shut of their devices if they don’t straighten up.

Read more about EyeForcer »

10 Supply drones could help prevent unwanted pregnancies in Ghana

It wouldn’t be an innovation count down without the ever-present robotic fleets that now populate our skies. Just like 3D printing, VR and other emerging tech, drones are being experimented with in many different industries. Carried out by the United Nations Population Fund, UAVs are now supplying condoms, birth control pills, and other medical supplies to the Upper East Region of Ghana.

Read more about UNPF »

Many shoppers want to buy the freshest produce, but knowing how long your food takes to get to your plate or cup has been almost impossible with big brand products. But now, Brazilian coffee company Café Pelé has teamed up with the local daily newspaper to show just how fresh their coffee is.

The coffee producers wrap their products in pages from that morning’s Estado de São Paulo newspaper before putting them on display in supermarkets. Around 5,000 bags of coffee beans are sealed in the early hours of the morning in the front pages of the Brazilian daily, then sold alongside copies of the newspaper, according to the website B9.

cafe-pele

On Café Pelé’s Facebook page, the company said: “Café Pelé and Estado de São Paulo together, in the same package, deliver a product that is always fresh for you.”

What other products — which are best when it’s fresh — can be wrapped in daily newspapers?