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Acoustic ceiling for concert halls adjusts in real time to the music being played

Sound & Music

Resonant Chamber is a new innovation from Michigan design firm RVTR that is able to contract and expand its many folds to make the most of the acoustics of the moment.

Now that we’ve seen automotive tires that can adapt automatically to changing road conditions, it’s not surprising to come across an acoustic ceiling for concert halls that adjusts in real time to the music being played. Resonant Chamber is a new innovation from Michigan design firm RVTR that “deploys the principles of rigid origami to transform the acoustic environment through dynamic spatial, material and electroacoustic technologies,” in the company’s own words. Similar in appearance to the classic fortune teller created through origami, Resonant Chamber is built to be able to contract and expand its many folds to make the most of the sonic conditions of the moment. “The goal is not ‘perfect’ acoustics, but rather variable acoustics for different applications,” RVTR’s Geoffrey Thun told Co.Design recently. “To enable a single venue to provide ideal conditions for a range of music performance and audience configurations would be fantastic.” Toward that end, a mix of reflective, absorptive and electroacoustic triangular panels are suspended from a track and can reportedly shift positions as needed to enhance the sounds emanating from below. The video below explains the premise in more detail: RVTR is currently working on a custom software interface for Resonant Chamber that will add additional capabilities; the company also aims to scale up its prototype into a 1,000-square-foot installation, Co.Design reports. Architectural entrepreneurs: one to get involved in?

Website: www.rvtr.com/research/resonant-chamber

Contact: www.rvtr.com/contact

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